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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the past year, we have seen great progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly
on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should always say their name and region at the beginning of their speech. otherwise -- the official record of our proceedings will be deficient. the writers will not know who you are unless you say. if you be good enough to pause, momentarily, before you start your speech, that will give an opportunity for the microphone to be activated. your gain here -- you're going to hear from the leader of the house and the leader, whom is my delight to welcome here today. leader of the house andrew, and angela. and the parliament tear undersecretary of state at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message fro
the uk's high divorce rate rather than promoting marriage. the coalition for equal marriage is love is love regardless of gender. well, i would add that love is love regardless of marital status. and while the majority of us, almost all of us absolutely believe in marriage for all his rate and yes, compared to some countries can bush legalize same-sex marriage some years ago, i note that the u.k. has been slow to act. if things are rapidly changing. the huge success of civil partnerships recognized commitment to same-sex couples has been a capitalist for this change. david cameron has pledged to legalize same-sex civil marriages by 2015. abdallah before marriage will be introduced here in this chamber in a 10 minute speech. i accept this as a plot to talk about such an important issue, but it's longer than i've got. i'm at the parliament or a cynical access marriage, there is a danger that any campaign will be overtaken by the legal change we seek. i conclude we have three main priorities. quality, quality, the national campaign will not provide the equality we required. more import
significantly reduced in large part the result of the great work of the u.k. and afghan armed forces. we remain committed to afghanistan for the long term and continue to support the development of the afghan national security forces through continued funding and involvement in training. continued contribution to a and the political process combine with armed forces efforts will underpin a state that is capable of policing its own lands. at this part al qaeda will not be able to reestablish itself in afghanistan. >> dr. julian lewis. the taliban have been told when most of our troops will be leaving and they need to be told what factions to expect if they help al qaeda to return. what will those sanctions be and would an allied regional strategic base serve to make incredible? >> the most important sanction for everyone to bear in mind is afghan national security forces are already at the level of 335,000 and increasingly capable and increasingly able to police and secure their own country but of course we will continue to be involved not least through the opposite training academy we will esta
service for senator taan -- daniel inouye. then the u.k. youth parliament holds a debate at the british house of of commons. >> president obama, vice president biden and former bill clinton spoke at the memorial services for the late hawaii senator daniel inouye today at the washington national cathedral in washington d.c. senator inouye died on monday at the age of 88 and was the second longest-serving senator in history. this is an hour and 45 minutes. .. >> i am resurrection and i am white said the lord. whoever has faith in me shall have lies, and everyone who has lies and has committed himself to me and she shall not die forever. as for me, i know that my redeemer lives and that at the last he will send upon the earth after my awakening, he will raise me up and in my body, i shall see god. i myself shall see in my eyes behold him who is my friend and not a stranger. for none of us have wife and hands of a none terms his own master when we die. for if we have life, we are alive in the lord and if we die, we die in the lord. so then, whether we live or die, we are the worse possessio
, relatively flattish trade, as well. the yield here on the spanish yield, 5.3%. the uk seeing yeldz slightly higher, as well. but, of course, it is christmas. it is the holiday season that we're up against. so you would anticipate that maybe some investor res closing out recent profits. sitting tight and waiting for that next year to start, karen. >> thanks very much, louisa. we are indeed in a festive mood. let me echo a very merry christmas to the viewers out there. on the agenda in the united states, there's no economic earnings start to go speak of this christmas eve. the markets will be closing early with the nyse and nasdaq depending at 1:00 p.m. eastern, the cme at 1:15 and the nymex at 1:30. the cme will close up shop at 1:45 eastern. u.s. investors get the monthly case-shiller home price index on thursday wednesday. thursday, it's jobless claims, new home sales and consumer confidence. friday, we round out on the week with the chicago pmi pending home sales. interesting to see the level of volume that we had in u.s. markets on friday. it was 4.8 billion shares traded. the fourth lig
questions on the immigration policy of the uk. this just over a half an hour. >> questions to the prime minister. >> this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues. i will have further such meetings later today. >> mr. speaker, can my friend and confirm that the fall in unemployment figures is the largest since records began? will he meet with me to discuss how employment opportunities, including youth employment, can be promoted? >> i would be delighted to meet with my honorable friend to discuss the situation. he is absent -- he is absolutely right. the largest quarterly fall in a youth unemployment on record, 72,000 fewer people unemployed this quarter. obviously, there is no room for complacency. there are far too many people that are long-term unemployed. in these figures, we can see 40,000 more people in work. unemployment is down by 82,000. over 1 million extra private sector jobs under this government. >> mr. speaker, today's fall in unemployment and rise in employment is welcome. part of the challenge remains a stopping at the high level of long-term unemployment. doe
't seen that in the u.k. where the unemployment really hasn't reason as a result of such a deep downturn. >> is that the key factor given that we have had unrest in the past in bad economic times? do you think this time it's the unemployment figures that have made the difference? >> it clearly made a big difference because it shared the burden where whole industries would be wiped out or close to wiped out like the coal and steel industries in the 1980's. there was a focus for decent, a focus for protest. now it's more widely spread. someone in their street has lost their job. maybe a small closure but nothing like the massive closures we witnessed in the early 1980's. if things don't get better very slowly does that start to put a strain on democracy? is that why we've seen a rice in some of these extremist parties in europe? >> you have to be careful associating them directly with recession. the french national front was as strong and appeared in austerity when jacques chirac the leader of the nacional he was second in the french election. so the socialists were out even though it was
to allow them to pay minimal tax in britain. >> not paying their fair share, despite being over the u.k. on every high street. it's gisting behavior. i pay my tax, why not starbucks? >> sometimes they position themselveses in other country to avoid paying high taxes here and britain. amazon did $320 million in turnover in the u.k. it paid less than $3 million in british tax. all of this within the law but parliamentary law accused them of immorally minimizing the tax obligation. some say don't blame the big guys. >> i don't moral is the way we ought to levy our taxes. it should be set out in law and fairly enforced by the tax authority. individuals have their own moral compass that guides what they choose to do. >> starbucks does appear to feel the heat of public pressure. saying we need to do more. we are looking at the tax approach in the u.k. the u.k. said it will tighten its tax regime but it has not said how. other european countrys have similar concerns. with some calling for more uniform taxation across the e.u., so some countries don't become tax havens at the expense of others.
in the history of the u.k. with all the prime minister's she has worked with how has that impacted her as a queen from your knowledge? >>guest: she has a vast store of information. she does not have the ideological filter. she takes things and and why she is so valuable to the people who come to her for confidentiality. prime ministers meet with her for one hour every week but others, she has the wisdom as well as a body of knowledge and an extraordinary memory for things. when public officials come to her to ask for guidance, they always remark, even if they are skeptical with a private audience, and nobody else is in the room to record which gives them freedom to say what is on their mind. harold wilson, a labor prime minister in the '70s is hard to say but she had an affectionate relationship with him. the private secretary said he considered her to be a very astute diplomat of the political scene. she can size people up and understand the new ones of a political situation. these things have given her a valuable role. not just a figurehead but a range of duties that people don't fully apprecia
to pakistan is reunited with her mother in the u.k. welcome to "bbc world news." also to come, no where to pray for moslems in athens. and a quite at hollywood that revolution, making big returns to the silver screen. >>> breaking news coming to us from singapore. in the past few minutes, it was just announced that the indian woman who was gang raped in delhi earlier this month that has caused national average has died. she was being treated at a hospital in singapore where she was on life-support. in india, her brutal attack triggered nationwide protests. the authorities struggling to contain the growing anger. we have received a statement from a doctor, the chief executive of the hospital where she was being looked after. "we are very sad to report the patient passed away peacefully at 4: 40 5:00 a.m. today singapore time. her family and officials from the high commission of india were at her side. we join her family in mourning her loss. the patient had remained in extremely critical condition since admission to hospital from the morning of december 27. despite all efforts by a team
of the best hospitals in the uk. i have to say there's been a huge media presence here today, more are coming in all the time from all parts of the world. i can tell you that the "daily mail" newspapers, one of the main selling newspapers in this country, is dedicating 14 pages to this in the morning so they are going very, very big on this indeed. it's a big story for the uk and the commonwealth. >> and the world. big story just beginning. max foster, thanks so much. that does it for this edition of "360." see you again one hour from now at 10:00 p.m. eastern. thanks for watching. "piers morgan tonight" starts now. >>> tonight, tragedy in kansas city. >> how many shots? >> a football star's shocking murder-suicide. two more victims of gun violence. now the great debate rages again. is it time for america to put down its guns? both sides go head-to-head. >>> also, one of the biggest names in the history of the game speaks out. hall of fame quarterback joe namath joins me exclusively. >>> plus, a man that many say is to blame in the standoff in washington and the threat of recession. grover no
the uk banned handguns. the surprising result that could change the gun control debate. "the kudlow report" start ises right now. >>> the big news tonight, still the developments in washington on the fiscal cliff, eamon javers joins us with the details. >> good evening, meshel. capitol hill sources tell cnbc that congressional leaders are planning to go to the white house tomorrow to meet with president barack obama and it is not entirely clear at this point when that meeting will take place and details are still being hammered out and we saw today a blistering series of rhetorical jabs from one side to the other and it's not clear as a result of all that whether a deal can, in fact, get hammered out in the remaining time before new year's eve and take a listen to senate republican leader mitch mcconnell earlier today explaining the problems he's facing in washington. take a listen. >> the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate d
to sweeping gun control changes in the uk. those changes were fueled by petitions signed by 750,000 people. that petition was created by dr. mick whose daughter died. welcome, mr. north. this must have brought back particularly painful memories back to you? >> yes, it certainly did. when i heard the age of the victims and the place in which it happened, it was inevitable that all sorts of memories were going to come back and most of those were likely to be painful ones. >> you became a symbol for new gun control in britain. you were very forceful about it. you got this extraordinary petition going and led to an almost complete ban on handguns. the difference here, it seems to g ce aseefainin3 %pland everye . oe ari don't k you've been in their very position, dr. north. is there any advice that you can give them, any words of comfort from somebody who's, quite literally, lived through what they've gone through in. >> i think one of the main strengths that those of us who lost children in dunblane found was being brought together and when we were in our own company, we were able to talk abo
is 2.4% more than the u.k. will the prime minister be gracious enough to congratulate iceland on working hard? >> if the case for an independent scotland is make us more like iceland, i am not sure i would -- that would totally recommend itself to the voters. i have a very good relations and i will make sure that remains the case. >> can i welcome the unemployment, where unemployment has fallen steadily, i urge the prime minister -- steadily. >> i am grateful for the point. we will continue for the use contract, and worked experience. what we are seeing is large numbers of people who go into work experience come off benefits, by a job, and find it is a good start to a career and a working career. that is what we want to see. i thank you. unemployment in scotland [indiscernible] is the prime minister as shocked as i am that some managers were encouraging employers to go into unpaid walk-in experience placements? will the prime minister condemn this practice immediately? >> an important point. we want work experience places to the additional places, encouraging more young people
this war-torn region. >>> and now we move onto a tragic headline out of the uk. one of the hospital workers who was duped by australian disc jockeys into believing the queen of england was on the phone for kate middleton, has been found dead, under mysterious circumstances. and no less than scotland yard is on the case. abc's lama hasan has the details. >> reporter: for a week, king edward vii hospital has been at the center of a white hot media glare. and one day after duchess kate checked out, tragedy. >> it is with deep sadness that i can confirm the tragic death of a member of our nursing staff, jacintha saldanha. >> reporter: it was saldanha who answered the phone on tuesday, when two australian djs impersonating the queen and prince charles, asked to speak with kate. >> hello, good morning, king edward vii hospital. >> oh, hello there, could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> oh yes, just hold on, ma'am. >> thank you. >> reporter: saldanha put them straight through to kate's private nurse, who unwittingly divulged details about her medical condition. it became a globa
, unemployment is 2.4% lower than the uk's. growth is 2.5% and -- [inaudible] will the prime minister be gracious enough to congratulate iceland for working hard and turning things around and maybe he can learn from iceland? >> i think if the case for an independent scotland is make us more like iceland, i'm not sure that will totally recommend itself to the voters. written and iceland have very good relations, and i will make sure that remains to be the ca case. >> could not also welcome the fall and the youth and unemployment were youth unemployed has fallen steadily for the past nine months. and is the lowest since may 2010. but i urge the prime minister took in 10 youth this conference investment into youth contract? >> i'm grateful for the honorable lady's point. we will continue not just for the apprenticeships which reach over 1 million under this government but also the youth contract and particularly work experience because what we are seeing is a large number so people who go into work experience come off benefits, find a job and find it a very good start to a career and a working group
afterwards. but by the time of 2002 until 2011 or 12, gun violence in the uk has plummeted by 44%. you simply cannot argue with facts and statistics like that. in australia, a massacre in 1996, inleapt into action. and in a consensus, they instituted a ban on the sale, import, ownership of semi automatics, what's known as assault rifles and pistols and again the gun crime plummeted like a stone. and harvard university did a really important study. they looked at massacres in the 18 years before the new laws. there were 13. 102 people were killed. after the new laws in australia, not one multiple shooting. facts don't lie. >> but they don't have a second amendment. they don't have the second amendment. >> it's not just the second amendment, though. we're in a political moment here where two forces are in tremendous conflict. one is this national revulsion at what happened. the polls have moved very quickly. >> six in ten said they would like to see the kind of gun used to kill those children, that bushmaster rifle outlawed. >> absolutely. that's a real phenomenon and you can see it in the reac
, this is getting coverage in the uk. i have a friend in peru who had seen it on tv in peru, it's all over the world. mexico is on a global stage right now, and they need to do the right thing. martha: this is an ally and a huge trading partner of the united states, and it's apparent to me that all you're asking for is fair treatment for your son, and that he be returned on what you see as a baseless charge. >> precisely. martha: john and olivia we hope your son gets home in time for christmas and he can share that special time with you and your family and get out of there. and we are going to stay on top of this story. we thank you so much for being with us today. thanks to you both. >> thank you. bill: it's a tough, tough time. jon scott is coming up a couple minutes away, hospitals what is going on. jon: a new report from an independent group. it has a lot to say about what went wrong in benghazi. the tere owe attack back on september 11th left four americans dead, and it says the state department messed up big time. we'll go in depth on that. plus the president just about to announce the steps h
in 1996 in scotland. the school massacre there led to sweeping gun control changes in the uk. those changes were fueled by petitions signed by 750,000 people. that petition was created by dr. mick whose daughter died. welcome, mr. north. this must have brought back particularly painful memories back to you? >> yes, it certainly did. when i heard the age of the victims and the place in which it happened, it was inevitable that all sorts of memories were going to come back and most of those were likely to be painful ones. >> you became a symbol for new gun control in britain. you were very forceful about it. you got this extraordinary petition going and led to an almost complete ban on handguns. the difference here, it seems to me, and i want to you explore this if you can, it's very political, the debate about handguns in america. it wasn't the same way back in britain, was it? >> no, it wasn't. there were politicians who stood by the gun lobby but i would say the majority of our mps have had an open mind on the subject or were very much in favor of doing something to tighten up on g
to the source. fast. [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> the southwest uk is getting hammered with rain causing some travel nightmares. it has to rain a lot in the uk to make any kind of difference. they're used to it. there is floodwater everywhere in devon, england. the drenching rain is causing massive travel problems. with roads and rail lines as well washed over. that's affecting the commute for people. britain's lined up sandbags on the weekend and now officials are warning people about even trying to get out on the roads. parts of wales and scotland are also getting flooded. >>> people in chile and argentina are watching a volcano that straddled the border between the two countries. the volcano has been spewing smoke into the sky. ash has been raining down on surrounding towns. you can see it there. almost looks like snow. it is ash. i'm joined now in the phone by larry masten. so far, chile is on red alert, but no one has been ordered to leave. why is that, larry? >> well, i can tell you based on what i've seen in the reports from the chilean agency, there was
uk burglars have no fears of getting shot by the homeowner. according to the united nations, scotland is the most violent industrialized country in the world. one of the reasons scotland is so violent is because the government in london has disabled the scots from being able to protect themselves against violent criminals. >> look me in the eye down this camera lens and tell me scotland is more dangerous than america, when you have 12,000 gun murders a year and 300 million guns, it's time, mr. kopel, to wake up and smell the cappuccino. got to leave it there. i'm sure we will debate this again. thank you both very much. >> thanks for having me. >>> joining me now exclusively to talk about the players' side of the story is former new york jets quarterback and hall of famer, joe namath. joe, welcome back. >> thank you, piers. good to be with you, buddy. >> it's an awful story, this, in so many ways and it raises a number of issues, gun control, we've just been debating on the show, the issue of concussion for top football players and the side effects, the issue perhaps of depression, of
that ruled -- i think is what will surprise some folks -- that there is a treaty that the u.s. and the u.k. are a party to, along with a lot of other parties, call the international child abduction treaty. and that treaty is what was upheld by the lower courts in the united states. so the mother was able to keep custody of the little girl. now the u.s. supreme court is hearing the case today and we'll see what happens. the effects of this, the impact of this will likely reach a lot of u.s. military. >> gretchen: recently in the news, there has been this american female actress who also had two children with a foreign national, i believe he was from france. >> right. >> gretchen: then he was able to take -- the judge in the u.s. ruled that he could take the children back to france and she has been trying to fight to get them back. >> exactly. and it's this treaty in the hague and it's meant to help prehave not parents from abducting children burks it seems like it's perhaps doing the opposite. >> steve: so the supreme court is not going to decide necessarily who the child lives with, but wi
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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